Tuesday, September 30, 2014

Top Ten Books That Were Hard For Me To Read


Top Ten Tuesday is a weekly meme hosted by The Broke and the Bookish

Here are my picks for the Top Ten Books That Were Hard For Me To Read:

(Confession: I originally linked to Goodreads, but almost half way through this post, I couldn't get Goodreads to load. I switched to Amazon starting at #5.)

1. The Tradd Street Series by Karen White (The House on Tradd StreetThe Girl on Legare StreetThe Strangers on Montagu Street, & Return to Tradd Street). I felt so conflicted while I was reading this series. On the one hand, I really like Karen White's writing style, and I LOVED the contents of the books themselves, for the most part. I have a low tolerance for anything even remotely scary or suspenseful, and there were times that I had to to step away from the books so I could calm my racing heart, but I always picked them back up after a few moments. My only issue with this series is the fact that I found the main character, Melanie Middeton, hard to relate to at times. As in, any time during which she was fighting with the main male character, Jack Trenholm. As in, any time the two characters were in a room together. I guess I just don't like her fighting style - I thought she gave in too easily to Jack, especially when I agreed with her argument. Nothing frustrates me more than a good fight with a crappy resolution.

2. Matched by Ally Condie. I think my hopes were just too high for this book. There wasn't anything wrong with it, per se, I just didn't click with it.

3. Looking for Alaska by John Green. I know, I know; what on earth is a John Green book doing on this list? If you're asking me that question, chances are you haven't read Looking for Alaska yet. This is one book that I honestly wish I hadn't read at all. I don't want to give too much away, but about halfway through the book, I threw it across the room and ranted to whoever was in earshot for the next week about how mad I was at John Green. If you've read it, you know exactly what I'm talking about.

4. The Winter Sea by Susanna Kearsley. I love Susanna Kearsley, and I actually did really like this book, it was just so thick... I had a hard time sticking with it. I think I put it down in the middle, then left it for a few months before picking it up and finishing the end. I certainly don't regret reading it; I just had a hard time staying focused on this one. The new cover is gorgeous, though! 


5. Full Disclosure by Dee Henderson. Again, an author I love with a book I just couldn't dig. I loved Henderson's O'Malley series in high school, and have read everything of hers that I can get my hands on, but this book seemed a little self-indulgent to me. I also had a really hard time connecting with Ann Silver, the main character, and especially with her relationship with Paul Falcon, the love interest.

6. Oryx and Crake by Margaret Atwood. Margaret Atwood is a great author and a tremendous human being - have you ever seen or read any interviews she has given? - but this is a book I probably would not have picked up had it not been assigned reading for the Sex, Gender, and Species in Science Fiction class (yes, that's a real class at USM. it was awesome.) I took a couple years ago. I grew up reading sci-fi/fantasy, so I'm not really sure what the disconnect was. Perhaps it was the very fact that it was assigned reading.

7. Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte. Yes, it's a classic. Yes, I've reread it multiple times. I just have SUCH a hard time with how meek and obedient and forgiving Jane is throughout the book. I'm sure it's just my big-sister protectiveness coming out, but every single time I read Jane Eyre, I want to grab Jane by the shoulders and shake her until she sees things my way.

8. The Fellowship of the Ring by JRR Tolkien. I confess, I haven't actually tried to read this book for about ten years, so maybe it's time to give it another go. My last attempt was at the beginning of high school, and I had only made it about a third of the way in before abandoning all hope. I think it was too slow, too dry, too descriptive, or all of the above. And to be honest, I sort of feel the same way about the movies. I could be walk into a room in which any of the trilogy is playing on the TV, and I would have NO idea which movie in the series I was watching. Except for maybe the first part of the first movie, or the last part of the last movie.

9. Lord of the Flies by William Golding. Another assigned reading, but this time for high school. As a fifteen-year-old girl, I found it difficult to relate to anybody or anything going on in this story. I have nothing else to say about it, really, except that I thought it was pretty darn gross at times, and plenty disturbing.

10. Heart of Darkness by Joseph Conrad. It probably isn't fair for me to add yet another assigned reading book to this list, but I feel justified, mostly because it was required reading for THREE DIFFERENT CLASSES. I had to read it for a classic novel class in high school, but it was also assigned in two different college courses. I generally enjoy classic novels, but this one was just a little too dark (and sometimes creepy) for my taste.

3 comments:

  1. I completely agree about Lord of the Flies and The Heart of Darkness. When I had to read HoD for a second class years after I initially read it, I just read extensive plot summaries because I just couldn't read it again. Thankfully, LotF hasn't popped back up in any of my classes.

    ReplyDelete
  2. I know what you mean about Jane Eyre. I love the story in its entirety, and had no problems getting through it the first time, but sometimes Jane made really bad decisions, and Mr. Rochester was just awful and horrid!

    ReplyDelete
  3. I loved Looking for Alaska but I totally get what you mean. It packs a punch (a surprising one)!

    ReplyDelete

 
BLOG TEMPLATE BY DESIGNER BLOGS